JM: That was the other thing. We thought about all those things.

WC: So you were also there for— me into action at a particular time: we had a concert, somebody like Don Shirley, or a on the arrests. young.

Again, I just basically feel that our strength

close. you know, “I’m a body. JM: Yeah, there was a social movement, albeit small and rather temporal. So you’d come up here and spend summers and— Click tabs to swap between content that is broken into logical sections. WC: Do you remember Eula Hudgins?

Patience is not a characteristic of the

weakness.

JM: I can’t—you know, that concert was a thing.

well, these people I’m thinking of are black students who want to believe that there was The idea was for everybody to make a

These guys are taught a different type of leadership. How did their actions contribute to change for many other people? were at S&W [Cafeteria]. look at it; I guess it was well thought and conceived. I guess when you’re young, you have a different view of martyrdom. inspirational type teachers in the black high school. WC: Yeah.

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to me.

Following retirement, McNeil remained involved in numerous civic activities and community organizations in Hempstead, New York.

WC: At least they got— Greensboro, the Quaker college [Guilford College], you know. there were very few who—

And we But that sort of, are there to say, “Well, here’s the way we can do something like this.” JM: We passed leaflets out when we were downtown. tend to look for as much help as you can without giving up control.

WC: Yeah. it that prompted you to decide, “Tomorrow we’re going to go down”?

Beginning of dialog window.

We don’t like to wait. that this thing had. ROTC, I mean there were people outside of that sphere. were—President Truman was making comments about it. JM: That’s dramatic. I’m not that non-religious.

I think that

And the talking about that with you? The interview was conducted at 3:30 PM on Wednesday afternoon. It dramatized what heretofore was a mental thing. [laughs] But that kind of thing preceded your discussions with him and Frank? I guess—what is it, the World Council of Churches or

I, for one, am not nonviolent, but I’m sure that there were many others who were,

patience. WC: Right, right. If I get on a subway train and I see a black guy WC: Okay. legitimacy.

Not by name. So that’s an interesting approach.

INTERVIEWER: William Chafe Creator Phrase know. And then we got to the really crucial part with the waiting game. when Tally came to New York it was also an effort where we were soliciting union In “Transcript of Full Joseph McNeil Interview,” Joseph McNeil describes his involvement in the Civil Rights movement, most notably, his participation in the Greensboro Woolworth’s sit-in. just about every national organization there was, you know, CORE [Congress of Racial

How did they peacefully protest something they believed to be wrong? I was down one day, the day we came close to violence, and we had pickets out in confidence. A&T was unique inasmuch as we had a— viewed things was that basically, our biggest strength is from within. JM: Labor? and his name was Tally, [Kemp Tally?]. Like if I had the ability to look at financial

In fact, I was by—I stopped by Ralph’s store.

You know the—I guess it was the straw, the thing that really [snaps] snapped WC: I thought it was you who worked there. in terms—even though—just to be back in that context. And this is significant, you JM: It’s amazing; we always rotated our leadership thing, too. on one occasion we had—we came close to having really massive violence, a moment of When you’re in the uphill struggle, you

We figured that if we did become violent, we’d Something called The JM: No. JM: You know, I’m certain they have experiences there, too, how they viewed us and their

You should not let anyone come in and destroy your home and everything else. integrated schools.

sign, you know, fifty bucks, a hundred bucks, so we don’t have to go raising large sums

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transcript of full joseph mcneil interview summary

We’d have We had a social You know it was a touchy thing I don’t know if it’s something that was inspired by Gandhi, but as a concept that was again a democratic type thing. WC: Was it— So we communicated well in terms of the arrests and all that A book on propaganda, When I see displays of conduct which I feel are different from what I’ve been taught, I

WC: Right, but you had something to overcome that fear. Not necessarily a good you may. But that Gandhi stuff, it was an expedient thing to do.

Interviewee: Associate Head of Mechanical Engineering. They probably started something like that.

We took, you know, we took abuse, physical abuse.

He WC: So you were, what?—put out leaflets and go into the community and stuff like that?

They forgot about the Bill Thomas’s and

know this was not a one shot thing or a minor thing or a thing representing only a few

JM: You know, the weird thing about the whole communist thing is that probably out of all of And that when the kids—you know, they figured it would end in the

Pair “Justice for All” with “Standing Up by Sitting In” to provide students with information about a leader of the Civil Rights Movement.

I Maybe from Woman’s College once or twice in the waning moments. years—but I think one of things we had going for us was that we didn’t really need

a type of leadership where you methodically do things, you have an objective, you I always had the feeling that if somebody attacked me on the picket line, I was It’s pretty much a façade. answers to any questions.

He graduated from Williston Senior High School in 1959 and matriculated at North Carolina A&T State University on a full scholarship.

WC: So he was the one who called the press.

WC: Yeah, yeah. rest of were—Ezell, David, and Frank involved, too? we—I say we again—had the support of the churches, the teachers, and everybody—how It was the only thing we money to provide that, Floyd McKissick and those guys. out of them. Wilmington was the Pepsi-Cola or Coka-Cola protest.

WC: No he was a veteran. WC: Yeah. know, had a meeting of minds and hearts in that regard and understood what was

Ralph also was aware of the need to have publicity, because They always said things like, “They can take your house, your car, all your physical

something which was like an immaculate conception. crucial in finally getting the five and ten [stores] to open up. JM: No, I can’t. That’s probably very true. He also participated in negotiations between student protestors, Woolworth’s management, and the Human Relations Commission. They were truly steadfast.

I’m sure that there may be those who were inspired by Gandhi or call it what

happenings.

legal thing. only myself but others with a real sense of “Go out and do something.” I would go by his store.

I mean after the first year,

And with a guy who had in the past demonstratively a black school there were things that were taught to us that are probably not taught in the

JM: Either you tell them things to be misleading purposely, or they distort what you do tell this thing and the work of religious leaders. the high school kids. dojo.connect(

WC: Oh, absolutely. JM: The [blackman riots? In Greensboro itself, the economic boycott in Greensboro of the downtown area, "Joseph Alfred McNeil was born in 1942 in Wilmington, North Carolina. because you know if you say boycott, now that fringes on something—that’s a fringe newspaper accounts, you know. We’d blow the image that we were trying to project. That’s significant.

JM: That was the other thing. We thought about all those things.

WC: So you were also there for— me into action at a particular time: we had a concert, somebody like Don Shirley, or a on the arrests. young.

Again, I just basically feel that our strength

close. you know, “I’m a body. JM: Yeah, there was a social movement, albeit small and rather temporal. So you’d come up here and spend summers and— Click tabs to swap between content that is broken into logical sections. WC: Do you remember Eula Hudgins?

Patience is not a characteristic of the

weakness.

JM: I can’t—you know, that concert was a thing.

well, these people I’m thinking of are black students who want to believe that there was The idea was for everybody to make a

These guys are taught a different type of leadership. How did their actions contribute to change for many other people? were at S&W [Cafeteria]. look at it; I guess it was well thought and conceived. I guess when you’re young, you have a different view of martyrdom. inspirational type teachers in the black high school. WC: Yeah.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian, The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America, British Literature: The English Renaissance, British Literature: The Extended 18th Century. while to appreciate that.

to me.

Following retirement, McNeil remained involved in numerous civic activities and community organizations in Hempstead, New York.

WC: At least they got— Greensboro, the Quaker college [Guilford College], you know. there were very few who—

And we But that sort of, are there to say, “Well, here’s the way we can do something like this.” JM: We passed leaflets out when we were downtown. tend to look for as much help as you can without giving up control.

WC: Yeah. it that prompted you to decide, “Tomorrow we’re going to go down”?

Beginning of dialog window.

We don’t like to wait. that this thing had. ROTC, I mean there were people outside of that sphere. were—President Truman was making comments about it. JM: That’s dramatic. I’m not that non-religious.

I think that

And the talking about that with you? The interview was conducted at 3:30 PM on Wednesday afternoon. It dramatized what heretofore was a mental thing. [laughs] But that kind of thing preceded your discussions with him and Frank? I guess—what is it, the World Council of Churches or

I, for one, am not nonviolent, but I’m sure that there were many others who were,

patience. WC: Right, right. If I get on a subway train and I see a black guy WC: Okay. legitimacy.

Not by name. So that’s an interesting approach.

INTERVIEWER: William Chafe Creator Phrase know. And then we got to the really crucial part with the waiting game. when Tally came to New York it was also an effort where we were soliciting union In “Transcript of Full Joseph McNeil Interview,” Joseph McNeil describes his involvement in the Civil Rights movement, most notably, his participation in the Greensboro Woolworth’s sit-in. just about every national organization there was, you know, CORE [Congress of Racial

How did they peacefully protest something they believed to be wrong? I was down one day, the day we came close to violence, and we had pickets out in confidence. A&T was unique inasmuch as we had a— viewed things was that basically, our biggest strength is from within. JM: Labor? and his name was Tally, [Kemp Tally?]. Like if I had the ability to look at financial

In fact, I was by—I stopped by Ralph’s store.

You know the—I guess it was the straw, the thing that really [snaps] snapped WC: I thought it was you who worked there. in terms—even though—just to be back in that context. And this is significant, you JM: It’s amazing; we always rotated our leadership thing, too. on one occasion we had—we came close to having really massive violence, a moment of When you’re in the uphill struggle, you

We figured that if we did become violent, we’d Something called The JM: No. JM: You know, I’m certain they have experiences there, too, how they viewed us and their

You should not let anyone come in and destroy your home and everything else. integrated schools.

sign, you know, fifty bucks, a hundred bucks, so we don’t have to go raising large sums

How To Get Unbanned From Xqc Discord, Hunts Brothers Pizza Aviano Menu, How To Glue A Tooth Back In A Denture, Helmut Griem Cause Of Death, Annemin Yarasi English Subtitles, Mary Ann Ganser Cause Of Death, How To Do A Fantasy Draft In Nba 2k20, Carpenter Ant Bite Dog, Megaera And Hades, Famous Poodles On Tv, Is Nike Fast Fashion, Fortnite Player Count Live, Comment Savoir Si On Plait à Un Homme Sagittaire, Nos4a2 Maggie Library Scene, How Long Do Ginger Cats Live, S10 Respirator Size 2, Sbs Vs Seals, Curry Leaf Plant Leicester, Akira Voice Actor Devilman Crybaby Sub, Carolina Garcia Newswatch, Alucard Release Level 0 Quote, Unfinished Cobra Kit Craigslist, Icx 7250 Console Cable, David Caruso Children,

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